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educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
and hard working students find a dream of a college education out of their financial grasp and allow redundant regulations and red tape to strangle our economic growth in innovation, the california promise will still be broken. my friends and fellow 49er faithful, california is in the red zone thanks to your hard work. now is not the time to sit on the ball. this is a year for all of us to set a national example. this is the year to take advantage of the sunnier skies to repair our neglected roof and the year california stops settling for good enough and replaces it with great again. with that, it's my honor to introduce a leader who's doing exactly what he promised to do, to tell the truth. to get california's fiscal house in order to bring down the mountain of debt and to demonstrate that this state can be progressive without being profligate and above all else, continue to make the case that the best is yet to come. a big round of applause for our governor edmond brown. >> thank you mr. speaker, fellow constitutional officers. all my friends gathered here this morning. california
in helping us better understand the link between education and poverty. we all know there is a link between education and poverty, but jonathan, give me the top line of this new book, fire in the ashes, and the 25 years you spent with children and a link to poverty. >> cornell always gets my blood boiling because i agree with him so deeply. i was a young teacher in boston and a white guy living in the black community, and the black ministers did me an honor of letting me stand by his side the first time he came to preach in boston common, and his words changed my life forever. that is when i turned my back on an academic life and decided to teach fourth graders in our poorest neighborhoods. i get so angry on his birthday or on martin luther king day -- i heard politicians who turned their back totally on every single thing he lived and died for, never lifted a finger to bring an end to apartheid in schooling, which is now at a higher rate than it was the year he died, and they say, "i, too, had a dream." you cannot play games with the dreams of our prophets. dr. king did not say he had a dr
, commissioner wynn. >> i wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it shows from my perspective where the district has been
, the bully project, and we have been bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting
help the district achieve its goal of equal access to quality education for all of its students. effectiveness of core substit e substitutes could be improved if their jobs were assigned no later than the night before. that was always practiced before previous years. currently jobs are assigned on the morning of the assignment. despite all reasonable efforts to reach the sights on time. it may be that we arrive late, this creates stress for the school staff and disrupts the student's learning routine. thank you. >> good evening commissioners. congratulations president norton and vice president fewer. and good evening superintendent. my name is darlene ania, and i am here today in my capacity as vice president of substitutes with uesf. i wish to direct attention to a problem that has impacted our students and schools for the entire fall semester. though initial steps have been taken to remedy this situation, i believe that this is an important issue which should be kind of spotlighted right now. so we don't have this same problem next year. the problem is an i.t. problem. the sy
francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions s
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
? that they will be fine, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comm
thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
the state education code, a misdemeanor child abuse conviction is not enough reason to fire a teacher. but the parents were not buying the explanation. one sobbing mother expressed the fear all of them felt that their children may have been hurt too. >> i have no idea what went on in this classroom. [ crying ] >> reporter: at the center of the storm, dina holder, convicted of throwing a 5-year-old autistic child to the floor and kicking him in a classroom 2.5 years ago. after it was reported, the district merely transferred her to another school. it was this woman's child. >> i don't care what's written down in a procedures manual or anything like that. i think that should be should have took a stand and said we need to get her away from kids. >> reporter: other parents say they want the school superintendent fired. >> for the district to subject our most fragile children is appalling, disgusting. we need answers. >> reporter: but the school district did not have the answers they wanted. >> we followed the advice of legal council under the state education code of california. >> that s
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family inst
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
adults. finally, with the department of education, hhs will soon launch what we are calling a national dialogue on mental health to help change the conversation and galvanize action about our children's mental health. we have come a long way in the prevention, treatment, and recovery support for mental and addictive disorders, but we have a long way to go, and we can do better. thank you for your time today, and i would be very pleased to answer any questions you may have. >> thank you very much. now we will turn to dr. insel. welcome, once again. please proceed. >> thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member alexander, and members of the committee. it is a real honor to be here, and it is a real pairing to have hyde -- administrator hyde and me on the same panel. as a person coming to you from the national institute of mental health and the national institutes of health, my role is around the research related to mental illness and thinking about how to come up with the science that will lead to better diagnostics, better therapeutics, a better understanding of what you called a silent epi
state education officials take action to ensure school districts are teaching english to nonenglish speaking children, claiming about a quarter of the school districts are violating state and federal laws by failing to provide english language instruction to students who need it. saying it will file a lawsuit unless classes are provided to 20,000 students within 30 days. a state education official says california is needing it's obligation autos san francisco district attorney is considering filing charges against an artist whose creation almost burned down a building. it happened last night in an art gallery. french artist created a map on the wall from 50,000 matches. idea to light it then create a slow burn but flames went out of control, shot into the ceiling, firefighters managed to put it out before it could cause more damage. >> oh, my. it turns out the fireball that lit up bay area skies last week is actually a comet. take a look. hundreds of people reported seeing the fireball. a scientist says that it was a comet entering just north of yosemite. it burned up over lake taho
with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track is a successful program
to make a motion to divide the question. one, about the 1.1 million dollars about the public education enrichment fund and separately 843 million dollars from the general fund's stays federal reserve. initially i wanted us to divide the file entirely to send two files to the mayor who indicated that he would sign it so that we could get the 1.1 million to the school district immediately. >> motion to divide is not debatable. will consider those two items. supervisor mar. >> i want to support the whole -- supplemental brought by supervisor kim. i want to speak to the accountability of the school district. another the former school board president, norman yee and others have successfully brought the school district to a stronger financial state. they have achieved a perfect score in the recent audit; never before has any governmental agency seen that. it's a good testament to the work that the former president of the school board jay kim and our colleague norman yee have done. also the sfusd action plan to presented the plan at the previous financial meeting showed that it was mone
performing urban school district. the leadership and work of many dedicated teachers and educators in that agency, in an agency very committed to closing that achievement gap because despite of having the top performer school district we also have the widest achievement gap. only in the last year we have seen a steady decrease in the gap and for me the investment is going to further decrease the gap. i am sorry i not mention the members of the committee, advocates, members of the san francisco parent -- college track, booker t. washington, -a -for your many months of work on this issue. the budget is always a choice, a choice of priorities. this rises to the top in terms of how we spent our general fund dollars i know we don't. all agree with where the source of funds come from. we have a 15 million dollar estate reserve fund, and now we have a 74 million dollar revenue top of that because of the increase in the economy. for me the commitment to the community is that if we are helping companies grow in the city and helping them prosper, that funding will eventually come back down
ugh a cooperative agreement with the u.s. department of education. (school bell rings) kids: school! (pants, barks) kid: word world! kids: word world! ♪ welcome to the place where words come alive ♪ kid: let's build a word. kids: word world. kid: word world. kids: ♪ jump to the beat ♪ ♪ clap your hands in the air ♪ kids: let's build a word! word world! kid: word world. ♪ we've got friends of every size ♪ ♪ building words before our eyes ♪ ♪ nothing's better than a letter ♪ ♪ they hold our world together ♪ ♪ with dog ♪ and sheep ♪ and duck ♪ and pig ♪ ♪ there's always a surprise! ♪ (barks) kids: word world! (croaks) (whimpers) (train toots) (giggles) ♪ welcome to our world ♪ kids: word world! ♪ word world ♪ kids: word world! ♪ it's a beautiful world ♪ ♪ word world. ♪ kids: yay! narrator: one afternoon in word world, pig was playing hide-and-seek with his good friend, ant. ant? ant?! (giggling): where are you, little buddy? come out, come out wherever you are. ow! ow! (m
cost of whenever you're buying. with us now, consumer education president, smart credit dot com. the president of optimum capital management. great to have you both year. al start with you. what do you make of this? >> this is really bad news for consumers. we are already getting nickel-and-dimed to death, and we are about to get even worse. essentially, the fee that the market had -- merchant has to pay to exit the credit card, cone -- commonly called a slight fee, in the past they have not been able to charge a line-item extra cost to the consumer to cover that. starting this sunday will be allowed to. that is the bad news. they have already baked in that she in the price of the merchandise the you're buying. so now not only unable to charge a fee on top of what you're already purchasing, but essentially paying the fee to times over, and those of us to pay cash are really getting screwed because we're still paying the fee for people using credit cards. gerri: i want to show people some of the details. sunday, storms have to inform customers if you're an online merchant as well
... by the departments of education of the states of... california florida, illinois... and new york. and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration and naturalization service. - pick up. - what's this ? it's what you ordered. "grilled pork tenderloin." well, it never looked like that before. i tried something a little different this time. - a little different ? - why don't you just serve it ? the customer is waiting. all right. you asked for it. wow ! that was better than last fourth of july. - are you all right, jamal ? - i'm okay. i'm not so sure about the alarm system. - where's mr. brashov ? - right here. i'm sorry about that mr. brashov, but i'm sure i can fix it. no problem. - what happened ? - oh, i crossed some wires. too bad you missed it, mr. brashov. the fireworks were terrific. i heard it. that was enough. how long will it take you to fix it, jamal ? oh. i'm not sure. i have to read the instructions again. sometimes it's hard to believe that jamal is an engineer. that's the trouble. he is an engineer, not a repairma
educate the public of the complexities of the british tax code, and does the public really care about those intricacies? probably not. so, on the one hand, by educating the public, you look defensive. by not educating them, then you're almost encouraging them to think that you are a big, greedy, terrible company trying to exploit your workers. it's a very difficult thing to play. >> big numbers expected later on from starbucks. >> aaron, thank you, thank you. do stay with us. there's much more to come here on "g.m.t." our science correspondent explains why biscuits provide a clue to the link between dogs and their canine ancestors. >> now, to the controversial construction of winter in airland, as they're being built to power homes in the u.k. there are combines the turbines stretching hundreds of feet into the air could damage the irish countryside. our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, reports now from the irish republic. >> one shining light in ireland's economic gloom is green energy, especially wind, where investment is booming all across the landscape. today's deal is par
school education. at 70 she centralled back to college, while travelling from a college library, she was at a bus stop, a guy came along, mugged her and tried to rape her. at that point, i decided that, i was going to make sure that every female in my family had the tools they need to protect themselves, groupon is targeting lawful gun ownership in this country. i've had enough. i'm sick of everything that is going on in media and news and dc, and congress and is a sayi, only thing they are doing is targeting lawful gun ownership. people are their time out of their busy schedule to take a 10 hour course, to learn gun save the to learn the law that surrounds the firearms and we're punishing these open, i say now, i'm not going to do, that my name is michael cargil, and i say boycott groupon. lou: michael cargil, from central texas. thank you. i bet he knows some folks to pro for you to in other parts of can the runty. -- of the country, michael, come back soon, will you. >> thank you, sir, i sure will. lou: when are record revenues just not enough? when wall street wants more, apple
education. [laughter] >> pam: have a great night
. there's personal-finance out of this over a period of years. our goal is to educate people for that great depression will never happen again. it's very much in the wake of its time. and i get that we can teach people certain skills. if they learn the skills we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like is on facebook. >> what's the best training for policeman? >> the best training you can get to become a really good police officer is to understand what it's all about. i will say that to the day i die. you learn to develop forces. you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships in a community at that is key. people in the 20 trust you, they will tell you when to our things that are happening that are not yet crimes. so that you can intervene. they will tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most of my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother t to the youngest polic
newspaper. >> president: i look forward to that joint education. next speaker. >> good afternoon supervisors. it is significant that with the new position of the podium the speaker can a longer see the computer or stop the clock. this is the first meeting of the new year, close to the time when newspapers review the previous year. let's take this opportunity to summarize the san francisco public library during 2012. the president of the library commission has been found guilty of official misconduct. this year it is finally unavoidable that the friends of the library are crooks and the continuing defense is exposed as self-serving, willful blindness. that that there was any credibility to lose. the city library has been found guilty of violating the sunshine ordinance and refer to the board of supervisors. attendance of the library commission meetings is so low that several would have been removed under the mayors announced attendance policy in the final months of 2012, a library commission only managed six meetings when the schedule called for nine. the whole schedule is below the attendanc
. one of the biggest, is education.the higher the degree, the bigger the paycheck. heebureau of labor statiitics says the median weekky earnings for someene without a high school diploma issjust under $500 ddllars. those with a diplomaa takeehome almost $650 a week -- while thooe who are unnversity thoosand. not only that, but the more eddcation you have, the more likell you areeto have a job.employers are clearly willing to pay morr for more expertise.the & iidussry you work innis another big factor in determining the siie of yoor salary. wages in the service sector tend to be at the lower end of the scale -- workers in home a little less than 500 a week . those with office aad construction jobssfind &pthemselves in the middle of the scale. the big buuks can & be foond in management and thee &business sector.and while it's no secret men make more thhn women do, race caa also skew that gap. for every dollar a man earns, an aaian woman while a black wwoan makes -3 allmst 87 percent.i'm alison kosik innnew yyrk. 3cooinggup... the manti ta'o -3
with the outspoken republican on education. >> still to come, virginia's governor suicide ideas on how to improve your commute. and what he reveals as his top priority. >> metro says it will cost $1 billion a year to maintain services. >> authorities have identified one of two women killed on a falls church house fire yesterday. investigators say the body of 48 laura snider was found at the fire. firefighters responding to a 3:25 alarm found the single family home engulfed in flames. a second body has not been identified. investigators are still looking for the cause of the fire. >> governor bob mcdonnell wants to improve your commute on the road and the rails. we were with him as he revealed his plan. >> too many cars and not enough choices. >> anything that gets rail out here quicker is a good deal. >> some of the most congested roads in the country are here in virginia. people like mark who commute three to four times a week are crying for help. virginia governor thinks he has the answer. he traveled the state to try to raise more transportation dollar
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills and that they learn these skills, we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online. like us on facebook. >> british prime minister david cameron says that if the conservative party is returned to power at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happe
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscie
laid out a number of executive actions was secretary arne duncan of the department of education that look at schools and the climate of bullying, school security increasing the number of school resource officers. a number of schools have metal detectors in them. if local schools want to increase their security, there are obviously free to do that. appropriations may be there to increase that. keeping the guns out of the hands of people who would use them for ill is the number one priority as well. i think you also have to take a look at what has happened in schools. a lot of people forget at columbine, they're actually where guards on the campus. they exchanged fire with the perpetrators of the crime. they were outgunned because the military-style assault weapons. it is not just having police and armed folks on school campuses. virginia tech had a police force and is what squad and they still were not able to bring down the shooter. host: the washington times above this --spreading gun hysteria is the way they put it. they ride gun owners should be concerned about the open seaso
and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no,
. and talk with your children and teens about the subject and get educated on the subject yourself so you can learn how it handle it and really talk to your children about it can be fun, it can be dangerous, these new toys that we have. >> wow. all right, i'd like to introduce the members of our panel today, rob is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. famili
women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyond part-time work so i totally agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am running a nonprofit organization -- >> i understand. >> with 500 women in it. i have also worked in america for the past 30 years, i don't think women are women's worst enemies, i think that is -- >> there's some of them. but they're not in the majority. >> i don't think they're the majority, i'm giving a different take on it to add to it the reason why we're not -- i've seen some women with sharp elbows th
school district meeting tonight. it starts in an hour. parents are outraged that a special education teacher who abused a child is still employed. cbs 5 reporter da lin spoke with the child's mother. da. >> reporter: that's right, ann. the mother and a lot of parents in this district are disappointed that the district did not fire that teacher and already even though the meeting is in an hour, there are already parents sitting here waiting for the doors to open. this is the agenda right here. the meeting will be held in that room behind those doors in about an hour. the superintendent and the district's attorney will be here to answer those questions, why they did not fire that teacher. lawyers questioned special ed. teacher gina holt in the video about whether she dragged a special needs student out of his chair and kicked him. >> i asked him about it. told me that it had happened at school. >> reporter: holt denied abusing the 5-year-old boy in 2010. yet she pleaded no contest to a count of misdemeanor child abuse. despite the conviction and a
foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood. ♪ - hi, neighbour. we're playing at miss elaina's house today. she lives in the museum-go-round, and she is a very fun friend. verrry fun. - (robot voice): daniel tiger, i'm so glad y
agrees. >> there is a division if we just grant citizenship to just doctors or highly educated individuals and not working class folks. that does create a division. >> reporter: the silicon valley leadership group also agrees and plans to push for overall immigration reform when high- tech ceos meet with ongoingal leaders in washington, d.c. february 4 and 5. robert handa, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the organization that already adopted a controversial crime-fighting policy. >> when we stop, we always have probable cause. >> why they say it's an acceptable practice. >>> preparing for a safe super bowl celebration. >> we're going to keep the safety of our city as the no. 1 priority. >> the plan to prevent chaotic scenes like this one from happening again. >>> a local art gallery set on fire. hear why it was done on purpose. >>> police say a woman has died after being shot inside a home in east san jose this afternoon. a spokesperson says emt's were called near south king road just after 1:30. the woman had at least one gunshot wound and ended up dying later at the hospital. polic
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